Posts Tagged ‘commandline’

Good article on Tuxradar with some clever command line hacks: Command line tricks for smart geeks

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009 at 13:46 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

Here’s how to find the version of your CentOS system from the command line: more /etc/redhat-release

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009 at 17:58 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

This post is about how to change the resolution (i.e. font size) of virtual terminals or “tty” in Linux. Virtual terminal is the basic command line interface which you see when you press <Ctrl><Alt><F1> (note: to get back to your existing Gnome or KDE session press <Alt><F7>). This is different from the Terminal emulator, such […]

Monday, September 21st, 2009 at 05:28 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

Sometimes it is necessary to split a large file into several smaller ones, for example so that they fit on a CD or USB disk or can be attached to email. It’s very easy to do this from command line. Suppose you have a file of 500 MiB called “large_file” and to split it into […]

Friday, September 18th, 2009 at 14:33 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

Nautilus and Thunar sometimes refuse to mount NTFS disk (e.g. a USB hard drive) when it was previously not unmounted cleanly from Windows. It is still possible to mount it from terminal shell by using the following command: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o force /dev/sdc1 /media/myntfsdisk Where /dev/sdc1 is the device you want to mount […]

Sunday, June 7th, 2009 at 15:56 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

To check for installed packages from the command line, use the dpkg command with the –get-selections option. This returns all packages installed on your system (most likely a lot!). So it is best to use grep to narrow down the search results. For example, the following command lists all packages with “fire” in the package […]

Thursday, May 28th, 2009 at 13:31 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

There is a simple tutorial on Ars Technica’s Open Ended site with several useful examples of the grep command. Further examples can be found in the comments section.

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009 at 13:41 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

Medical images, e.g. X-Rays, are commonly stored in the DICOM format. By default you won’t be able to open these in Ubuntu, but there is actually a package in the repositories which lets you convert DICOM image files to more common formats, e.g. JPEG, PNG or bitmap. sudo apt-get install dcmtk dcmj2pnm +oj img00000 img00000.jpg […]

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009 at 13:27 | 1 comment
Categories: Linux

Sometimes you may want to log in with a different user account in Terminal without logging out from your X session or switching to an unused virtual console. There are two different approaches to do this in Ubuntu: interestingly, it is possible without even knowing the other user’s password. Approach 1: if you know the […]

Thursday, April 30th, 2009 at 16:03 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux

Here are a few useful commands for finding version information of various system components. Linux distribution name and version lsb_release -idrc System information, including kernel version uname -a X.org version X -version Java version java -version Package version dpkg -s <insert package name>

Saturday, April 25th, 2009 at 06:56 | 0 comments
Categories: Linux